FOLDING CHERI CASINO, PART 1

Cheri Casino

 

 

In the past I’ve written about betting and raising, but neglected the most common action players take at any poker table. It’s not glamorous. It’s not memorable, but it is our basic bread and butter play, and we do it more often than we do anything else. We fold.

 

That’s what we do most of the time. Even loose players probably fold more than they call, and even the most unrepentant maniacs might fold more often than they raise. Face it; good, solid, selective-and-aggressive players fold most of the time. But it doesn’t come across in the literature that way. While we’re used to reading about those big confrontations upon which reputations are made and myths are created, there’s generally a lot of down time between watershed events. And most of that downtime is the result of looking at your cards, deciding they are plug ugly and not worth a plug nickel’s investment, so you throw them away.

 

It’s high time we created a better appreciation for the unglamorous act of laying your hand down, avoiding the fray for the time being, and saving your money for a better situation.

 

Do You fold Often Cheri Casino Enough?

The single biggest mistake made by most poker players is that they call when they should have folded. After all, most recreational players come to play ¾ not to lay down their hands ¾ and many get involved in pots with weak, unplayable starting hands. There are hold’em players who will see the flop with any ace in their hand, regardless of their position in the betting order, with no consideration for the number of opponents in the pot, or the amount of betting and raising that has taken place before it is their turn to act.

 

Folding In Split-Pot Games

The problem with calling far too often, when folding would be the better course of action, is not limited to hold’em either. It is an epidemic in Omaha/8. With four cards in their hand, many players just can’t resist seeing the flop. The sad truth is that the more potential starting hand combinations you’re dealt ¾ and with four cards dealt to you in Omaha you have six unique two-card combinations, compared to just one in hold’em ¾ the more selective you should be.

 

 

 

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